Library Book Sale!

library-book-sale

Last weekend was the fall Library Book Sale.  It’s tied with the Spring Library Book Sale and Christmas as the best event of the year.  Below is my haul.  I bought all of these for $20.50, and I can’t wait to dig in.  If I ever get my to-be-read book list down to less than three shelves again I can justify going to the book sale on half price day for twice the books.  This is my reading goal before the Spring sale.  🙂
The Keeper of Lost Causes, Jussi Adler-Olson.  I hadn’t heard of this book before, but from a brief perusal it seems it right up my alley.  Absurdist, humorous crime drama?  Yes, please.

Pigs in Heaven, Barbara Kingsolver.  Let’s be honest, with a few rare exceptions, Kingsolver writes a variation on the same book over and over.  Smart woman feels like an outsider, is doubted by others, eventually finds belonging in a rural area where she least expected it.  I don’t care, I love her writing and will read that book over and over.  This is a sequel to her novel The Bean Trees, which was beautiful, so I look forward to continuing it.  And it was $.50, so it’s not like I had a choice.

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, John Le Carre.  I’ve read other Le Carre books, but never this classic.  I feel like I’ve come across it when reading about tons of other books and in other reviews, though, where books are often compared to The Spy Who Came In… as a classic.  So it’s probably about time I read it, and as I’m generally a fan I think it was a good choice.

This Is a Book, Demetri Martin.  I expect this was a fun choice, and it’s probably good for me to pick up something light hearted every now and again.  Martin is one of my favorite comics (comics named Martin seem to be very talented) and not least because all of his comedy is just a bit unusual.  I am not expecting to be surprised by this book, but I think it’ll generally be a fun read for someone who likes Martin anyway.

Guadalajara, Quim Monzo.  Most of this year’s book purchases were books that I’ve heard of or by authors I’m familiar with.  There weren’t nearly as many leap-of-faith purchases as I sometimes have.  This was one of the few.  It’s a short story collection by a Catalan author, Quim Monzo, who I hadn’t heard of before.  The short stories are reimaginings of other classics, such as The Iliad and Metamorphosis, and I was intrigued.  Plus, I just read two other excellent short story collections, so I suppose I’m hoping this is as good as those.

Inherent Vice, Thomas Pynchon.  One description I read of this book called it “exciting and accessible”, the latter not usually the word I land on when describing Pynchon.  But why not?  After all, Crying of Lot 49 is fun if you don’t always demand your books make sense.

My Year of Living Biblically, A.J. Jacobs.  I was actually in the religion section looking for Year of Biblical Womanhood, which I’ve been wanting to read forever.  But I remembered that this was a book that had struck my fancy years ago as well.  As a regular church goer, and also fascinated by religion in general, I had wanted to check this book out.  I’m a little nervous it’s going to be too superficial for my tastes, but I’m cautiously optimistic about it.

Genome, Matt Ridley.  My budget for the book sale is a fairly strick $20 (except for that the Kingsolver book was $.50 so I grabbed it) and so I put back a Mary Roach book to grab this one.  I hope I made the right choice.  But, genomics is incredibly interesting, and I feel like I need a better base of knowledge to figure out what’s real and what isn’t when I read the latest breaking news about CRISPR or other genetic breakthroughs.  Here’s hoping this book was what I’m looking for.

Musicophilia, Oliver Sacks.  What is there to say?  This is an Oliver Sacks book, and I haven’t read it yet.  What choice did I have?  I love Oliver Sacks–and if you haven’t read him yet, you absolutely should.  Even if the book doesn’t initially look like it’s up your alley, I guarantee you’ll love it.  He’s an amazing writer, and all of his stories are fascinating.  I feel pretty good about this one.

Planets, Dava Sobel.  Sobel is another really wonderful science writer.  I’ve read Galileo’s Daughter, which was a very insightful and informative background into the truth of Galileo’s dispute with the Church, and Longitude, which was a fantastic book about the search for a way to measure longitude and how it ties into understandings of time.  I hadn’t heard of this one, but when I saw her name on the shelf I snatched it up.

The Creation, E.O. Wilson.  One of my favorite environmental books is The Future of Life on Earth by Wilson, a truly gifted writer and brilliant biologist.  The Creation, addressed to Christians and other people of faith, as an appeal to religion to save creation, is a book I’d heard of but had forgotten about it.  It’s a slim volume, but I look forward to beautiful language and hopefully some new insights.

And that’s it for this haul.  Now I need to dig in to these books.  Happy Reading!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: